Our demands – it’s time to act!

© Public Eye
The practices of Swiss commodities traders may be legal, but they are illegitimate and violate human rights; companies are making their profit at the expense of the health of millions of African people – who have the same right to good health as we do.

The practices of Swiss commodities traders may be legal, but they are illegitimate and violate human rights; companies are making their profit at the expense of the health of millions of African people – who have the same right to good health as we do.

  • African governments (and other governments with weak fuel standards) should set stringent fuel quality standards of 10 ppm sulphur  for  diesel  and  gasoline, and  introduce  European-style limits on other health damaging substances (benzene, polyaro-matics, etc.).
  • The governments of countries which act as export hubs for African fuels (such as the Netherlands, Belgium, or the United States) should prohibit the export of any health-damaging fuels or blendstocks which do not meet the legal standards of their own countries.
  • Swiss trading companies should stop abusing double stan-dards on fuel qualities, and with immediate effect produce and sell  only  high-quality  ultra-low  sulphur  (European  standard) fuels worldwide. And finally the
  • Swiss government should implement mandatory human rights and environmental due diligence requirements for Swiss companies, covering the entire supply chain and including potentially damaging products.

Return to Sender: toxic air returns to Geneva

In their statements, commodities trading companies like to present themselves as responsible. To remind them of this, Public Eye shipped a container full of toxic air from Ghana’s capital Accra back to its sender, Trafigura, the company from Geneva that has set itself the goal of becoming “recognised as industry leader in terms of social responsibility”.

Dirty Diesel - Return to sender

A total of 19,071 people signed our petition calling on Trafigura to stop using its illegitimate business model. Trafigura did accept the petition but, just like Vitol, Glencore, Addax & Oryx and Mercuria, hides behind the legality of this toxic business model and the claim that African governments have sole responsibility for the issue.

Return to sender: Public Eye returns the polluted air of Ghana to Trafigura